© 2017 by Cherokee County Marshal's Office

Are you ready?

Hurricane

While Cherokee County is located away from the coast, tropical storms and hurricanes have caused great damage within our county.

Local major danger during a hurricane... Inland Flooding

In the last 30 years, inland flooding has been responsible for more than half the deaths associated with tropical cyclones in the United States. 

Freshwater floods accounted for more than half (59%) of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths over the past 30 years. These floods are why 63% of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths during that period occurred in inland counties. At least 23% of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths occur to people who drown in, or attempting to abandon, their cars. 78% of children killed by tropical cyclones drowned in freshwater floods. 

So, the next time you hear hurricane -- think inland flooding!

What can you do in case of Inland Flooding?
  • Determine whether you live in a potential flood zone.

  • If advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

  • Keep abreast of road conditions through the news media.

  • Move to a safe area before access is cut off by flood water.

  • Do not attempt to cross flowing water. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle.

  • Develop a flood emergency action plan.

  • Have flood insurance. Flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance. Do not make assumptions. Check your policy.

High Winds
  • Monitor NOAA Weather Radio.

  • Store outdoor furniture, trash cans and other items that may become flying missiles.

  • Be prepared to be without power for extended periods.

  • Follow generator safety rules.

  • Go to your safe room if winds become dangerous.

  • Be ready to use your family disaster plan.

  • Do not travel during the times of high winds.

What can you do in case of High Winds?

Strong winds can accompany thunderstorms that rotate around a land-falling hurricane or tropical storm. These winds can gust to over 75 MPH causing damage to structures and making driving hazardous. Strong winds combined with heavy rain can cause trees to uproot and crush vehicles and homes. The falling trees can make travel very hazardous and close roads for long periods of time.

  • Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the local hurricane evacuation route(s) to take and have a plan for where you can stay. 

 

  • Put together a disaster supply kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, first aid supplies, and copies of your critical information if you need to evacuate.

 

  • If you are not in an area that is advised to evacuate and you decide to stay in your home, plan for adequate supplies in case you lose power and water for several days and you are not able to leave due to flooding or blocked roads.

 

  • Make a family emergency communication plan.

 

  • Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications.To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet for your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”

What does a Hurricane Watch mean?

A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the next 48 hours.

What does a Hurricane Warning mean?

A hurricane warning means that hurricane conditions are possible within the next 36 hours.